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Can Twins Switch Sides in the Womb?

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If you’ve got two buns in the oven, you might feel jabs and kicks in every direction. As you watch and feel your belly move about, you might wonder whether they are wrestling, doing somersaults and switching sides in there.

Even with all of those twists and turns, you can be assured that those babies are on their relative side of the womb at the end of the day.

Switch Sides in the Womb

 

Types of Twins

The type of twins you have in your womb will determine how they are situated and grow. If you have monozygotic or identical twins, they were formed from a single fertilized egg that divides into two halves.

About 70 percent of these babies share a single placenta, according to the University of California, San Francisco Medical Center. On the other hand, if you have fraternal twins, two separate eggs were fertilized. These babies will usually have separate placentas.

 

Regular Fetal Movement

According to MayoClinic.com, it is normal for fetuses to twist and move in your uterus during your pregnancy. As you get into the third trimester, those babies are starting to run out of room. You will notice less movement than you did during the second trimester.

Even if they are moving around less frequently, it is possible for twins to wiggle into different positions in your womb. However, switching sides completely is unlikely, if not impossible, because of the placenta and amniotic sac positioning.

 

Baby A and B

When you get an ultrasound during your pregnancy, the people doing your ultrasound will refer to your babies as Baby A and Baby B. This is a way to indicate that Baby A is the baby closer to your cervix and Baby B is farther up. However, Baby A doesn’t always stay in that position.

 

Baby Body Positioning

In the final weeks of your pregnancy, your twins will get into the position for birth. Usually one of the babies will position himself head down and the other will be head down, breech or horizontal.

According to the Family Education website, this position happens in about 75 percent of twin pregnancies. It is possible for Baby A, who has been closer to your pelvis most of your pregnancy, to switch with Baby B during the final weeks and now have him be first in line to be born.

 

Hands in the Womb

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